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Why Externalism Is Not a Problem for Ethical Intuitionists

Philip Stratton-Lake
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society
New Series, Vol. 99 (1999), pp. 77-90
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Aristotelian Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4545296
Page Count: 14
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Why Externalism Is Not a Problem for Ethical Intuitionists
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Abstract

Ethical intuitionists are often criticised on the ground that their view makes it possible for an agent to believe that she ought to ? whilst lacking any motive to ?-that is, on the ground that it involves, or implies a form of externalism. I begin by distinguishing this form of externalism (what I call 'belief externalism') from two other forms of ethical externalism-moral externalism, and reasons externalism. I then consider various reasons why one might think that ethical intuitionism is defective in so far as it involves, or implies belief externalism, and argue that these objections are unpersuasive.

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