Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Epidemiology of Endemic Cholera

Thomas A. Cockburn and James G. Cassanos
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 75, No. 9 (Sep., 1960), pp. 791-803
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/4590925
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4590925
Page Count: 14

You can always find the topics here!

Topics: Cholera, Rain, Vibrio, Infections, Monsoons, Epidemiology, Water tanks, Surface water, Epidemics, River water
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($44.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Epidemiology of Endemic Cholera
Preview not available

Abstract

A theory is presented to explain the long-recognized connection between the incidence of cholera and changing weather conditions in Bengal. The theory is that in hot, dry weather algae in the village water tanks raise the pH of the water so high that the cholera vibrio is favored over other organisms. The potentialities of these ponds of surface water which serve as the village water supply in spreading infection and the ability of the cholera vibrio to withstand a high pH have been noted. Results of weekly tests of the pH of six tanks for a 1-year period and observations of the relationship of the pH to weather and to incidence indicate that the pH is a factor to be taken into account. It is suggested that the tanks are the chief means for spread of the vibrio and that the endemic infection is primarily rural rather than urban. Cholera is endemic in Bengal, the major remaining focus of infection, because of polluted drinking water. The eradication of cholera from Bengal, and therefore from the world, depends largely on the success of the Pakistani and Indian Governments in replacing the village tanks with a source of safe water.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793
  • Thumbnail: Page 
794
    794
  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800
  • Thumbnail: Page 
801
    801
  • Thumbnail: Page 
802
    802
  • Thumbnail: Page 
803
    803
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[unnumbered]
    [unnumbered]
Part of Sustainability