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Rabies Transmission by Nonbite Route

Denny G. Constantine
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 77, No. 4 (Apr., 1962), pp. 287-289
DOI: 10.2307/4591470
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4591470
Page Count: 3
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Rabies Transmission by Nonbite Route
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Abstract

To test suspicions that two persons who died of rabies had been infected via a nonbite route during visits to bat-infested Frio Cave near Uvalde, Tex., various native carnivores (foxes, raccoons, opossums, coyotes, ringtails, skunks) and domestic dogs and cats were kept in cages in the cavern. Twelve foxes and ten coyotes, including some kept in bat-proof and arthropod-proof cages, died of rabies after periods of from 24 to 30 days in the cave. Virus was isolated and identified by the serum neutralization test. Incubation periods ranged from 28 to 109 days. All but two of the animals had been kept in isolation at least 6 months prior to the 1961 experiment. The findings support consideration of an airborne medium, such as an aerosol, as the mechanism of transmission of rabies.

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