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Effects of Naturally Fluoridated Water on Dental Caries in Adults: Aurora-Rockford, Illinois, Study III

Harold R. Englander and Donald A. Wallace
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 77, No. 10 (Oct., 1962), pp. 887-893
DOI: 10.2307/4591654
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4591654
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Naturally Fluoridated Water on Dental Caries in Adults: Aurora-Rockford, Illinois, Study III
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Abstract

The dental caries experience determined by clinical means of 896 white, native residents of Aurora, Ill., aged 18-59 years, who had consumed 1.2 ppm of natural fluoride almost continuously from birth was compared with that of 935 white natives of Rockford, Ill., who used fluoride-deficient water. None of the subjects had been away from their respective communal water supplies for more than 5 years after 18 years of age. The average age for persons examined in Aurora was 33.6 and for Rockford, 33.1, and the two groups were similar with respect to sex and socioeconomic factors. Age-specific dental caries experience rates were significantly less in Aurora than in Rockford. Subjects from Aurora had an approximate average of 10 decayed, missing, or filled teeth and 22 decayed, missing, or filled tooth surfaces, while their Rockford counterparts had 17 DMF teeth and 43 DMF surfaces. Thus, the dental caries experience of Aurorans was roughly 40 to 50 percent less when evaluated by teeth and surfaces. The proportion of edentulous persons found in Rockford was about seven times greater than in Aurora. This study provides further evidence that dental caries does not "catch up" during a normal lifetime in adults who consume an optimum concentration of fluoride almost continuously from birth.

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