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Morbidity Patterns and Related Variables of 269 Student Nurses

Robert W. Hillman, Magda Reuter, Elsie Demarest, Virginia M. Smith and Ruth A. Wanzer
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 82, No. 1 (Jan., 1967), pp. 85-91
DOI: 10.2307/4592953
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4592953
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Morbidity Patterns and Related Variables of 269 Student Nurses
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Abstract

The morbidity experience of 269 student nurses during a 28-month period of closely supervised training has been observed to be generally comparable with patterns reported for other population groups. The average frequency of illness involving absence from duty was 1.2 per year, representing a mean loss of 5.4 days per year. Respiratory conditions accounted for 47.8 percent of total absence from duty and digestive disorders for 9.4 percent. Injuries were responsible for 3.8 percent of days lost, and 5.1 percent was attributed to infections, predominantly of the skin. Infectious mononucleosis accounted for 6.2 percent of all absenteeism. A comparatively small proportion of the students accounted for a relatively large percentage of total group illness, in terms of absenteeism and visits to the student health service. The morbidity experience was significantly lower among students born in the first quarter of the year, as well as among two successive classes of the five represented in this study. Suggestive though not significant associations were noted between morbidity patterns and such variables as birth rank, maternal age, age at menarche, psychological status, social class, and ethnic origin.

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