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Obstetrical Care and Social Patterns in Metropolitan Boston

Derek Robinson
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 82, No. 2 (Feb., 1967), pp. 117-126
DOI: 10.2307/4592962
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4592962
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Obstetrical Care and Social Patterns in Metropolitan Boston
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Abstract

A sample of 4,236 certificates of births occurring in Metropolitan Boston in 1962 has provided information on obstetrical care and social patterns for out-of-wedlock and maritally normal births in the metropolitan area. Projected to the total population, this information shows the particular importance of in-migration as a source of potentially high-risk births, with city-born women providing a relatively small proportion of these births. The facilities of the city were overwhelmed by the problem-burdened mothers, normally resident in the suburbs or in more distant nonmetropolitan areas. Considerable disparity occurred in the use of hospitals for dealing with the high-risk social, economic, and ethnic groups, not all of which could be ascribed to factors of maternal convenience. The deployment of physician skills was determined apparently by social, economic, and ethic factors rather than by group obstetrical needs and risks. The findings suggest that closer statistical examinations are needed to reveal the true influence of apparently adverse factors associated with infant and amternal mortality. These factors include the way in which medical resources are expended. It is concluded the suburban and rural populations are indebted to the obstetrical resources of the metropolitan core.

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