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Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Pesticides in Major River Basins, 1957-65

A. W. Breidenbach, C. G. Gunnerson, F. K. Kawahara, J. J. Lichtenberg and R. S. Green
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 82, No. 2 (Feb., 1967), pp. 139-156
DOI: 10.2307/4592967
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4592967
Page Count: 18
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Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Pesticides in Major River Basins, 1957-65
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Abstract

The results of the synoptic pesticide surveys of 1964 and 1965 and the examination of stored carbon adsorption extracts for water years 1958 through 1965 revealed that dieldrin has dominated pesticide occurrences in all river basins since 1958. Endrin occurrence reached a maximum, particularly in the lower Mississippi River in the fall of 1963 (the first quarter of water year 1964). Since then, endrin levels have decreased. Major fish kills in the lower Mississippi, which had occurred previously during the late fall months, were not reported in 1964 or 1965. DDT and its cogeners have been fairly common since 1958, and they have been slightly increasing. A noticeable agreement was seen in data from grab samples and CAM samples in both frequency of occurrence and concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides. This suggests that occasional synoptic surveys may be adequate to characterize pesticide levels on a broad scale in areas where there are no dominant sources of pollution. In areas such as the lower Mississippi River, however, the variability of both dieldrin and endrin clearly requires a greater sampling frequency, possibly including continuous sampling backup with the CAM method.

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