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Journal Article

Prevalence of Ascariasis and Amebiasis in Cherokee Indian School Children

George R. Healy, Neva N. Gleason, Robert Bokat, Harry Pond and Margaret Roper
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 84, No. 10 (Oct., 1969), pp. 907-914
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/4593709
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4593709
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Prevalence of Ascariasis and Amebiasis in Cherokee Indian School Children
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Abstract

Single stool specimens, collected from each of 631 children at the Cherokee Indian Elementary School, Cherokee, N.C., were examined for intestinal parasites. The organisms identified and their prevalence were as follows: Ascaris lumbricoides, 49 percent; Trichuris trichiura, 38 percent; hookworm, 3 percent; Entamoeba histolytica, 11 percent; Entamoeba hartmanni, 35 percent; Entamoeba coli, 40 percent; Endolimax nana, 46 percent; Iodamoeba bütschlii, 5 percent; Giardia lamblia, 9 percent; Dientamoeba fragilis, 11 percent; Chilomastix mesnili, 3 percent; and Trichomonas hominis, 11 percent. Evidence of infection with one or more parasites was found in 92 percent of the children. The amebic prevalence rate, which can be used to measure the extent of ingestion of organisms through fecal contamination, was 74 percent. There was no difference in the prevalence of A. lumbricoides or T. trichiura between Indian boys and girls. Although there was a slight reduction in the prevalence of some parasites (A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura, and G. lamblia) in children of the higher elementary grades as compared with the lower ones, in many cases an equal or greater number of children in the higher grades were parasitized with E. histolytica and E. hartmanni as compared with children in the lower grades. In general, the survey revealed a high prevalence of intestinal parasites in children throughout the eight grades of the school. An indirect hemagglutination test for amebiasis was used to detect antibody in the serums of 617 of the children. The results revealed no cross reactions with any other intestinal parasites. They also indicated that this test was of little value in asymptomatic intestinal amebiasis.

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