Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Low Birth Weight and Perinatal Mortality

Gunnar af Geijerstam
Public Health Reports (1896-1970)
Vol. 84, No. 11 (Nov., 1969), pp. 939-948
DOI: 10.2307/4593720
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4593720
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Low Birth Weight and Perinatal Mortality
Preview not available

Abstract

An analysis of Swedish data on incidence and mortality of low-birth-weight infants and a comparison with available U.S. statistics indicates that the higher U.S. infant and perinatal mortality is caused mainly by a higher proportion of low-weight births. Possible reasons for Sweden's more favorable position in this regard may be found in its lower birth rate, its homogeneous population which has no under-privileged minority groups, its social welfare system and compulsory health and sickness insurance, and its well-developed and highly specialized prenatal and maternity care. All prenatal, delivery, and postnatal services are provided free of charge to everyone as a part of the general health insurance. A screening system is used to detect women at risk for premature birth or other obstetrical complications so that they may be given specialized prenatal and delivery care. As a probable result, 75 percent of all Swedish children--but 80 percent of the prematures--are born in maternity hospitals or hospital departments which have obstetrical specialists. The resources of a modern hospital are not immediately available for less than 1 percent of all pregnant women.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
939
    939
  • Thumbnail: Page 
940
    940
  • Thumbnail: Page 
941
    941
  • Thumbnail: Page 
942
    942
  • Thumbnail: Page 
943
    943
  • Thumbnail: Page 
944
    944
  • Thumbnail: Page 
945
    945
  • Thumbnail: Page 
946
    946
  • Thumbnail: Page 
947
    947
  • Thumbnail: Page 
948
    948