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Distribution of Visual Acuity in Egypt. A Comparison of Random and Self-Selected Samples of Urban and Rural Residents

Mohyi-Eldin Said, Hyman Goldstein, Ahmad Korra and Khalil El-Kashlan
Health Services Reports
Vol. 89, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1974), pp. 247-255
DOI: 10.2307/4595026
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4595026
Page Count: 9
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Distribution of Visual Acuity in Egypt. A Comparison of Random and Self-Selected Samples of Urban and Rural Residents
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Abstract

A comparison was made of the results of house-to-house vision screening of a 4 percent random sample of households (consisting of about 11,000 persons of all ages and socioeconomic levels) in some urban and rural areas in and around Alexandria, Egypt, with the results of screening of a self-selected sample of about 145,000 persons in the same geographic areas. Comparisons were made of age-adjusted percentages of the various visual acuities for each eye by sex and urban-rural residence for the random and self-selected samples. The self-selected, age-adjusted percentages for visual acuity of 6/6 (20/20) were significantly increased over those of the random sample. This was true for the age-adjusted percentages for each sex and for each eye and by urban-rural residence. When comparisons were made of similar percentages for visual acuity of 6/60 (20/200) or less, the findings show that the percentages were significantly decreased in the self-selected sample when compared with the counterpart percentages in the random sample. Generally, the changes in percentages because of self-selection were greater in rural areas than in urban areas.

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