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Forecasting Need and Demand for Home Health Care: A Selective Review

Rabinder K. Sharma
Public Health Reports (1974-)
Vol. 95, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1980), pp. 572-579
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4596406
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Forecasting Need and Demand for Home Health Care: A Selective Review
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Abstract

Three models for forecasting home health care (HHC) needs are analyzed: HSA/SP model (Health Systems Agency of Southwestern Pennsylvania); Florida model (Florida State Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services); and Rhode Island model (Rhode Island Department of Community Affairs). A utilization approach to forecasting is also presented. In the HSA/SP and Florida models, need for HHC is based on a certain proportion of (a) hospital admissions and (b) patients entering HHC from other sources. The major advantage of these models is that they are relatively easy to use and explain; their major weaknesses are an imprecise definition of need and an incomplete model specification. The Rhode Island approach defines need for HHC in terms of the health status of the population as measured by chronic activity limitations. The major strengths of this approach are its explicit assumptions and its emphasis on consumer needs. The major drawback is that it requires considerable local area data. The utilization approach is based on extrapolation from observed utilization experience of the target population. Its main limitation is that it is based on current market imperfections; its major advantage is that it exposes existing deficiencies in HHC. The author concludes that each approach should be tested empirically in order to refine it, and that need and demand approaches be used jointly in the planning process.

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