Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Infectious Disease in a Total Institution: A Study of the Influenza Epidemic of 1978 on a College Campus

Jeff Sobal and Frank C. Loveland
Public Health Reports (1974-)
Vol. 97, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 1982), pp. 66-72
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4596637
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Infectious Disease in a Total Institution: A Study of the Influenza Epidemic of 1978 on a College Campus
Preview not available

Abstract

The Influenza epidemic of 1978 was studied on a college campus, since a college is a type of "total institution" in which work, residence, and recreation are all concentrated in one organization with clearly delineated social boundaries and a unique social structure. A survey of a sample of 418 persons (378 students, 40 faculty members) revealed that more than 48 percent of the students contracted influenza and that the intersemester vacation was a social factor that may have aided in the disease's penetration of the institution's boundaries. The vacation exposed the students to the distase, and the resumption of classes allowed influenza to spread rapidly in the student population, which was concentrated within the boundaries of the educational institution. The faculty exhibited relative immunity to the disease compared with the students, having only a 5 percent attack rate. There were no significant differences in the incidence or duration of illness among the students by sex, year in school, residence area, floor of residence, fraternity or sorority membership, or participation in fraternity or sorority recruitment activities.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72