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Estimation of Kinship Parameters: The Island Model with Separate Sexes

Martyn G. Murray
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Vol. 16, No. 2 (1985), pp. 151-159
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4599759
Page Count: 9
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Estimation of Kinship Parameters: The Island Model with Separate Sexes
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Abstract

Information from pedigrees provides the most accurate means of estimating relatedness within and between social groups, but the method has the disadvantage of requiring long-term breeding records. If a regular system of mating occurs, then kinship parameters may be estimated from recurrence relations which describe the change in coancestry and inbreeding from generation to generation. Breeding records collected over a single generation are therefore sufficient. In this paper, the island model is used for the derivation of general expressions of the coancestry and inbreeding coefficients in a dioecious population with non-overlapping generations. An equation for the average coefficient of coancestry ($f^{JJ}$) within a juvenile cohort is first found, and the other coefficients are then easily obtained. Parameters required are the inbreeding effective numbers of male and female parents and the migration rates of the two sexes. - In species with overlapping generations, the average coefficient of coancestry of the juvenile cohort is not related simply by migration rates to the average coancestries of the adult classes. The difference arises because average coancestry between pairs of individuals chosen from different cohorts is not in general the same as that between pairs of the same cohort. The precise difference depends on the mating system and cohort structure of the social group. Suitable modification to the basic expression for $f^{JJ}$ is described. The use of the composite method is illustrated by reference to the social units of two large mammals: prides of lion and clans of impala.

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