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Sexual Selection and Mating System in Zorotypus gurneyi Choe (Insecta: Zoraptera): II. Determinants and Dynamics of Dominance

Jae C. Choe
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Vol. 34, No. 4 (1994), pp. 233-237
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4600938
Page Count: 5
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Sexual Selection and Mating System in Zorotypus gurneyi Choe (Insecta: Zoraptera): II. Determinants and Dynamics of Dominance
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Abstract

Body size is clearly an important factor influencing the outcome of agonistic contests, but is often weakly correlated with dominance ranks in Zorotypus gurneyi Choe (Insecta: Zoraptera). The study of the development and dynamics of dominance relations using artificially constructed colonies show that age, or tenure within the colony, is the prime determinant of dominance among males. Dominance hierarchies become relatively stable within 2 or 3 days and males that emerge later normally begin at the bottom of the hierarchy regardless of size. Males interact much more frequently when they are simultaneously introduced to each other than when they are allowed to emerge at different times. In the latter case, males that emerge late appear to recognize relative dominance of older males and avoid direct contests. Considering the high correlation between dominance rank and mating success, there is a strong selective advantage to males that emerge earlier and such pressure of sexual selection may be responsible for the difference in life history strategies between Z. gurneyi and its sympatric congener, Z. barberi Gurney, in central Panama.

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