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G//ana Territorial Organization

Elizabeth Cashdan
Human Ecology
Vol. 12, No. 4 (Dec., 1984), pp. 443-463
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4602755
Page Count: 21
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G//ana Territorial Organization
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Abstract

This analysis of G//ana territorial organization shows how land rights are acquired and how they affect patterns of land use. Both spatial and social boundaries are discussed. It is shown that the appearance of overlapping spatial boundaries is clarified through a focus on the land rights of individuals and a consideration of historical population movements over the region. The discussion of social boundaries shows that, while interterritorial marriage and mobility networks are extensive, increases in property and food production appear to be associated with a closing of social boundaries (increased social nucleation). This is suggested by greater endogamy and a trend toward patrilineal inheritance of land rights in recent years.

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