Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Early Utilization of Flood-Recession Soils as a Response to the Intensification of Fishing and Upland Agriculture: Resource-Use Dynamics in a Large Tikuna Community

Nicholas Shorr
Human Ecology
Vol. 28, No. 1 (Mar., 2000), pp. 73-107
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4603345
Page Count: 35
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Early Utilization of Flood-Recession Soils as a Response to the Intensification of Fishing and Upland Agriculture: Resource-Use Dynamics in a Large Tikuna Community
Preview not available

Abstract

The optimal use of Amazonian flood-recession soils in contexts of dense settlement is, according to many anthropologists, agronomists, and ecologists, the cultivation of proteinaceous cereals and legumes. Storable protein is thought to be necessary for nutritional security through the fish-poor season. Campo Alegre, a Tikuna floodplain community of over 1300 people, is one of the largest indigenous Amazonian communities in the contemporary ethnographic record. Furthermore, some two-thirds of its agricultural production is directed toward market sale. However, in the summers of 1994 and 1995, residents cultivated no proteinaceous crops on their extensive floodplain to store for later consumption. Their utilization of these soils, a relatively new resource for them, is best understood in relation to the intensification of two traditional resource bases--fisheries and upland soils, the resulting pressures on their production flows, and the desire to maintain them.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[96]
    [96]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107