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Build-Up of the Himalayan Avifauna through Immigration: A Biogeographical Analysis of the Phylloscopus and Seicercus Warblers

UIf S. Johansson, Per Alström, Urban Olsson, Per G. P. Ericson, Per Sundberg and Trevor D. Price
Evolution
Vol. 61, No. 2 (Feb., 2007), pp. 324-333
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4621289
Page Count: 10
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Build-Up of the Himalayan Avifauna through Immigration: A Biogeographical Analysis of the Phylloscopus and Seicercus Warblers
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Abstract

The Himalayan mountain range is one of the most species-rich areas in the world, harboring about 8% of the world's bird species. In this study, we compare the relative importance of immigration versus in situ speciation to the build-up of the Himalayan avifauna, by evaluating the biogeographic history of the PhylloscopuslSeicercus warblers, a speciose clade that is well represented in Himalayan forests. We use a comprehensive, multigene phylogeny in conjunction with dispersal-vicariance analysis to discern patterns of speciation and dispersal within this clade. The results indicate that virtually no speciation has occurred within the Himalayas. Instead, several speciation events are attributed to dispersal into the Himalayas followed by vicariance between the Himalayas and China/Southeast Asia. Most, perhaps all, of these events appear to be pre-Pleistocene. The apparent lack of speciation within the Himalayas stands in contrast to the mountain-driven Pleistocene speciation suggested for the Andes and the East African mountains.

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