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Census Data Issues for Epidemiology and Health Risk Assessment: Experiences from the Small Area Health Statistics Unit

David Briggs, Daniela Fecht and Kees de Hoogh
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A (Statistics in Society)
Vol. 170, No. 2 (2007), pp. 355-378
Published by: Wiley for the Royal Statistical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4623164
Page Count: 24
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Census Data Issues for Epidemiology and Health Risk Assessment: Experiences from the Small Area Health Statistics Unit
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Abstract

Census data are vital components of epidemiological studies, but the issues that are involved in using these data in such studies are often not fully appreciated. The paper describes some of the problems and uncertainties that arise, and some of the approaches that can be used to address them, based on experience in the Small Area Health Statistics Unit at Imperial College London. Issues considered include the geography of census data (zone design systems, recasting and the role of postcodes), temporal aspects of census data (especially in relation to migration and population change) and information content (especially in relation to characterization of socio-economic status). In the light of these issues, opportunities to improve the resolution and utility of census data for epidemiological studies are discussed.

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