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"Turning and Turning": Coleridge on Our Knowledge of the External World

H. J. Jackson
PMLA
Vol. 101, No. 5 (Oct., 1986), pp. 848-856
DOI: 10.2307/462360
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/462360
Page Count: 9
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"Turning and Turning": Coleridge on Our Knowledge of the External World
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Abstract

As a conceptual framework, the ascending spiral does not originate with Coleridge, but it appears in his work in a prominent and distinctive form. Although he used the figure at first to describe the external world-and modified it for that purpose during the 1820s-Coleridge soon connected it with the human world of the mind as well. Attempts to put it to work as a principle of development in his writings include the revised Friend of 1818 and the Aids to Reflection of 1825.

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