Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

β-Maltose Is the Metabolically Active Anomer of Maltose during Transitory Starch Degradation

Sean E. Weise, Kirsten S. Kim, Robert P. Stewart and Thomas D. Sharkey
Plant Physiology
Vol. 137, No. 2 (Feb., 2005), pp. 756-761
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4629716
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
β-Maltose Is the Metabolically Active Anomer of Maltose during Transitory Starch Degradation
Preview not available

Abstract

Maltose is the major form of carbon exported from the chloroplast at night as a result of transitory starch breakdown. Maltose exists as an α- or β-anomer. We developed an enzymatic technique for distinguishing between the two anomers of maltose and tested the accuracy and specificity of this technique using β-maltose liberated from maltoheptose by β-amylase. This technique was used to investigate which form of maltose is present during transitory starch degradation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), wild-type Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two starch deficient Arabidopsis lines, and one starch-excess mutant of Arabidopsis. In Phaseolus and wild-type Arabidopsis, β-maltose levels were low during the day but were much higher at night. In Arabidopsis plants unable to metabolize maltose due to a T-DNA insertion in the gene for the cytosolic amylomaltase, (Y. Lu, T. D. Sharkey [2004] Planta 218: 466-473) levels of α- and β-maltose were high during both the day and night. In starchless mutants of Arabidopsis, total maltose levels were low and almost completely in the α-form. We also found that the subcellular concentration of β-maltose at night was greater in the chloroplast than in the cytosol by 278 μM. We conclude that β-maltose is the metabolically active anomer of maltose and that a sufficient gradient of β-maltose exists between the chloroplast and cytosol to allow for passive transport of maltose out of chloroplasts at night.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
756
    756
  • Thumbnail: Page 
757
    757
  • Thumbnail: Page 
758
    758
  • Thumbnail: Page 
759
    759
  • Thumbnail: Page 
760
    760
  • Thumbnail: Page 
761
    761