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Isolation of DNA Fragments Associated with Methylated CpG Islands in Human Adenocarcinomas of the Lung Using a Methylated DNA Binding Column and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

Masahiko Shiraishi, Ying H. Chuu and Takao Sekiya
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 96, No. 6 (Mar. 16, 1999), pp. 2913-2918
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/47463
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Isolation of DNA Fragments Associated with Methylated CpG Islands in Human Adenocarcinomas of the Lung Using a Methylated DNA Binding Column and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis
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Abstract

We have constructed a library of DNA fragments heavily methylated in human adenocarcinomas of the lung to permit the comprehensive isolation of methylated CpG islands in cancer. Heavily methylated genomic DNA fragments from tumors of nine male patients were enriched using a methylated DNA binding column and used for construction of the library. From this library, DNA fragments having properties of CpG islands were isolated on the basis of their reduced rate of strand dissociation during denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Approximately 1,000 clones, corresponding to 0.3% of the library were analyzed, and nine DNA fragments were identified as being associated with CpG islands that were methylated in tumor DNA. One CpG island was methylated specifically in tumor DNA, whereas the remaining eight CpG islands were methylated both in normal and tumor DNA derived from the same patients. Our results suggest that the number of CpG islands methylated specifically in tumors is not large. The library, which contains DNA fragments from methylated CpG islands comprehensively, is expected to be valuable when elucidating epigenetic processes involved in carcinogenesis.

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