Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Egg Hatching and Resource Partitioning in Stoneflies (Plecoptera): Ten British Species in the Family Nemouridae

J. M. Elliott
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Feb., 1988), pp. 201-215
DOI: 10.2307/4773
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4773
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Egg Hatching and Resource Partitioning in Stoneflies (Plecoptera): Ten British Species in the Family Nemouridae
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) The objective was to compare variations in egg hatching between three Protone-mura spp., two Amphinemura spp., Nemurella pictetii and four Nemoura spp. (interspecific variations) and between populations of each species (intraspecific variations). There were significant interspecific, but not intraspecific, differences in female size, adult life-span and egg production. (2) There were interspecific, but not intraspecific, differences in the percentage of eggs hatching within the range 3.8-22.1 degrees C in the laboratory; optimum temperatures being 4.7 degrees C (A. standfussi), 6.5-6.7 degrees C (P. montana, N. erratica) and 8.7-9.5 degrees C (P. praecox, P. meyeri, A. sulcicollis, N. pictetii, N. cambrica, N. avicularis, N. cinerea). Over 50% of the eggs hatched in the range 5-15 degrees C, the only exception being A. standfussi (2-9 degrees C for 50% hatched). (3) There were interspecific, but not intraspecific, differences in the incubation period and the length of the hatching period in the laboratory; both variables were adequately represented by a negative power-function in relation to water temperature over the relevant range (3.8-12.1 degrees C for A. standfussi, 3.8-22.1 degrees C for other species). Degree-days could also be used to predict hatching time in P. montana (336 degrees days), N. erratica (356 degrees days), N. cambrica (289 degrees days). For all ten species, the power-functions obtained from the laboratory data provided good estimates of incubation periods for egg batches placed in a Lake District stream. (4) Interspecific differences in egg development in the ten species are related to their different larval habitats and flight periods (months in which adults are present). These differences ensure a continual succession of species throughout the year and a reduction in competition between closely-related species; this reduction being almost total for the cold-water stenotherms (A. standfussi, P. montana, N. erratica) and species living in still or very slow running water (N. avicularis, N. cinerea), but only partial for the remaining species. This investigation and a previous one on six Leuctra spp. (Elliott 1987) provide examples of a physiological mechanism by which complex resource partitioning can occur in closely-related species.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215