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Hunter-Gatherer Territoriality: Ideology and Behavior in Northwest Australia

Valda Blundell
Ethnohistory
Vol. 27, No. 2 (Spring, 1980), pp. 103-117
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481222
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481222
Page Count: 15
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Hunter-Gatherer Territoriality: Ideology and Behavior in Northwest Australia
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Abstract

Aboriginal territorial organization in Northwest Australia is viewed as a set of ideas operating in the minds of the hunter-gatherers, while their behavior is viewed as an expression of this ideology. Data are presented to show how the ideology is translated into behavior, and, in particular, how demographic differences among groups influence this process of translation. It is shown that flexibility in behavior is possible without modification to the underlying ideological system.

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