Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Native Enclaves in the Upper Amazon: A Case of Regional Non-Integration

Anthony Stocks
Ethnohistory
Vol. 30, No. 2 (Spring, 1983), pp. 77-92
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481242
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481242
Page Count: 16
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Cite this Item
Native Enclaves in the Upper Amazon: A Case of Regional Non-Integration
Preview not available

Abstract

The ethnohistory of the Cocamilla Indians of Eastern Peru is examined in order to explain why they, as an ethnic group, have survived the holocaust of contact, missionization, and peonage over the past 400 years. Explanation is sought at various levels of analysis in: (1) the Cocamilla subsistence economy which remained significant to the Spanish after contact, (2) the social institution of the closed corporate community, and continuity in age/sex role relations, and (3) the non-integration of regional society based on an extractive economy characterized by disjunct sectors of production, a disjunction that has allowed the incorporation of the native enclave into the regional class structure.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[81]
    [81]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92