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Another View: Margaret and Me

Esther S. Goldfrank
Ethnohistory
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Winter, 1983), pp. 1-14
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481499
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481499
Page Count: 14
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Another View: Margaret and Me
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Abstract

This paper documents the position that theoretical differences in anthropology are not a new phenomenon, but characterized earlier periods - now viewed in retrospect as comparatively "uniform" - in the development of the discipline. On the basis of interactions of Margaret Mead and the author, from their meeting in 1922 until Mead's death in 1978, this discussion calls into question the unity of anthropological thinking during the period in which the field assumed its professional identity. Two specific points are particularly addressed: (1) the Apollonian-Dionysian classification of American Indian cultures, and especially (2) issues in the formation of the culture-and-personality "school" of the 1930s-1940s.

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