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Entomological Considerations in Southeastern Aboriginal Demography

Darrell A. Posey
Ethnohistory
Vol. 23, No. 2 (Spring, 1976), pp. 147-160
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481514
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481514
Page Count: 14
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Entomological Considerations in Southeastern Aboriginal Demography
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Abstract

Insects are one of the most important ecological factors affecting man and yet they have been largely ignored in anthropological studies. In the Southeastern U.S.A. Amerind groups recognized the importance of insects and adapted their own behavior through a sophisticated knowledge of insect behavior. Insects and insect products were used and traded extensively, and were imbedded in myth and lore, especially that concerning disease. Depletion of Amerind populations may be closely correlated with the transport from the Old World of typhus and plague.

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