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Who Were the Hohokam? The Evidence from Pima-Papago Myths

Donald M. Bahr
Ethnohistory
Vol. 18, No. 3 (Summer, 1971), pp. 245-266
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481534
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481534
Page Count: 22
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Who Were the Hohokam? The Evidence from Pima-Papago Myths
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Abstract

A corpus of thirteen Pima-Papago myths is examined for historical evidence concerning the prehistoric Hohokam peoples in southern Arizona and concerning the origin of the Buzzard moiety among Pimans. It is suggested that most myths involving the Hohokam express a death and rebirth ideology which may have been influenced by any of four sources, including diffusion from central Mexico, an actual Hohokam conquest, Spanish expeditions in search of Cíbola, and the ghost dance movement.

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