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The Four Lives of a Micmac Copper Pot

Calvin Martin
Ethnohistory
Vol. 22, No. 2 (Spring, 1975), pp. 111-133
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481641
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481641
Page Count: 23
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The Four Lives of a Micmac Copper Pot
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Abstract

What to the seventeenth-century French was little more than a mundane article of commerce became, to the Acadian Micmac, an institution with noteworthy economic, ceremonial, spiritual, and demographic connotations. Utilizing portable kettles, Micmac households became less inclined to camp near their immobile wooden cauldrons which now served a diminishing function as the symbolic locus of settlement. The copper kettle thus afforded these people the opportunity to move about at random as they hunted game for the fur trade.

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