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Africans and Indians: A Comparative Study of the Black Carib and Black Seminole

Rebecca B. Bateman
Ethnohistory
Vol. 37, No. 1 (Winter, 1990), pp. 1-24
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/481934
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/481934
Page Count: 24
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Africans and Indians: A Comparative Study of the Black Carib and Black Seminole
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Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts the histories and social structures of two Afro-Indian groups, the Black Carib and the Black Seminole, to uncover more about how they originated as distinctive "new peoples." It focuses on the role that the structure of domestic and community relations has played in preserving their distinctiveness and discusses the differences between these groups in regard to their relationships with the Indians whose names they bear.

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