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The Pirates of Piscary: Ethnohistory of Illegal Fishing in New Jersey

Bonnie J. McCay
Ethnohistory
Vol. 31, No. 1 (Winter, 1984), pp. 17-37
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/482021
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/482021
Page Count: 21
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The Pirates of Piscary: Ethnohistory of Illegal Fishing in New Jersey
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Abstract

This paper investigates piscatorial piracy-fish and shellfish poaching-in the past and present experience of commercial fishing communities of the Raritan Bay region of New Jersey. Ethnographic and historical research supports the following interpretations: piracy is cultural; it is a response to enclosure of the marine commons; and it is grounded in historical disputes over property rights in marine resources that suggest the importance of class-specific social relations within the fisheries.

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