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Northern Iroquoian Horticulture and Insect Infestation: A Cause for Village Removal

William A. Starna, George R. Hamell and William L. Butts
Ethnohistory
Vol. 31, No. 3 (Summer, 1984), pp. 197-207
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/482621
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/482621
Page Count: 11
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Northern Iroquoian Horticulture and Insect Infestation: A Cause for Village Removal
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Abstract

Employing ethnological, historical, and entomological data, this paper examines the issue of insect infestation of cultivated fields among Northern Iroquoians as a cause for village removal. It is concluded that by adding another systemic variable to the issue of shifting villages among such groups our understanding of the complexities of the adaptive process of horticulture is enhanced.

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