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Who Were the Aní-Kutánî? An Excursion into Cherokee Historical Thought

Raymond D. Fogelson
Ethnohistory
Vol. 31, No. 4 (Autumn, 1984), pp. 255-263
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/482712
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/482712
Page Count: 9
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Who Were the Aní-Kutánî? An Excursion into Cherokee Historical Thought
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Abstract

Evidence assembled and examined in this article reviews a prehistoric revolt by the Cherokees against a priestly class or hereditary clan, the Aní-Kutánî, whose members, according to legend, were massacred in a public uprising in response to their corruption and sexual improprieties. Some evidence relates the Aní-Kutánî to the historic Cherokee clan, the Aní-gilohí; and some, to the historic Cherokee Fire priests. The author interprets the legend as a dramatic epitomization of Cherokee cultural processes by which tendencies towards hierarchy conflicted with tendencies towards egalitarianism.

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