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The Structure of a Legacy: Military Slavery in Northeast Africa

Douglas H. Johnson
Ethnohistory
Vol. 36, No. 1, Ethnohistory and Africa (Winter, 1989), pp. 72-88
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/482742
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/482742
Page Count: 17
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The Structure of a Legacy: Military Slavery in Northeast Africa
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Abstract

This article examines the impact of a military institution on civilian life in Northeast Africa. Slave armies used by a series of states during the conquest of the Sudan and East Africa drew on societies on the periphery of the state and spread networks of military and military-derived communities, all defining themselves by reference to the state but retaining links with those groups which supplied them. These networks are still active.

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