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Women, Religion, and Power: Gender and Resistance in Daily Life in Late-Seventeenth-Century Santiago de Guatemala

Martha Few
Ethnohistory
Vol. 42, No. 4, Women, Power, and Resistance in Colonial Mesoamerica (Autumn, 1995), pp. 627-637
Published by: Duke University Press
DOI: 10.2307/483148
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/483148
Page Count: 11
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Women, Religion, and Power: Gender and Resistance in Daily Life in Late-Seventeenth-Century Santiago de Guatemala
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Abstract

Women's power to reshape and refabricate social identity is explored in two case studies from the records of the Holy Office of the Inquisition. Women manipulated religious symbols, language, and rituals to push against the narrowly defined structures of their lives. Gender, along with race and class, is central to understanding resistance strategies in colonial life.

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