Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Body Weight, Longevity and Reproductive Success in Red Squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris)

Luc Wauters and Andre A. Dhondt
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 58, No. 2 (Jun., 1989), pp. 637-651
DOI: 10.2307/4853
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4853
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Body Weight, Longevity and Reproductive Success in Red Squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris)
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Two populations of red squirrels were studied by capture-mark-recapture over a 3-year period in different habitats. (2) Survival was positively correlated with body weight in the second winter of life, independent of body length. (3) Females weighing less than 300 g did not come into oestrus. In a logistic regression model, female body weight and dominance were the best predictors of fertility. (4) In the coniferous habitat, body weight when lactating and the difference in weight over the lactation period predicted success in raising offspring. In the deciduous habitat body weight was the best predictor, while the probability of having young was negatively influenced by body length and age. (5) In the coniferous woodland, both body weight and longevity were significantly correlated with lifetime reproductive success of females. In the deciduous woodland, only body weight had a significant effect due to early breeding in some females with poor survival. (6) Squirrels of high rank weighed significantly more than those of lower rank. Dominance rank also increased with age. (7) Body length was weakly correlated with habitat quality, but there was a strong effect of habitat quality on body weight. Large squirrels settled in areas with the best seed-crop, and gained more weight than those that settled in areas with a poorer seed-crop.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
638
    638
  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641
  • Thumbnail: Page 
642
    642
  • Thumbnail: Page 
643
    643
  • Thumbnail: Page 
644
    644
  • Thumbnail: Page 
645
    645
  • Thumbnail: Page 
646
    646
  • Thumbnail: Page 
647
    647
  • Thumbnail: Page 
648
    648
  • Thumbnail: Page 
649
    649
  • Thumbnail: Page 
650
    650
  • Thumbnail: Page 
651
    651