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How Can We Boost IQs of "Dull Children"?: A Late Adoption Study

Michel Duyme, Annick-Camille Dumaret and Stanislaw Tomkiewicz
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 96, No. 15 (Jul. 20, 1999), pp. 8790-8794
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/48565
Page Count: 5
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How Can We Boost IQs of "Dull Children"?: A Late Adoption
              Study
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Abstract

From 5,003 files of adopted children, 65 deprived children, defined as abused and/or neglected during infancy, were strictly selected with particular reference to two criteria: (i) They were adopted between 4 and 6 years of age, and (ii) they had an IQ <86 (mean = 77, SD = 6.3) before adoption. The average IQs of adopted children in lower and higher socioeconomic status (SES) families were 85 (SD = 17) and 98 (SD = 14.6), respectively, at adolescence (mean age = 13.5 years). The results show (i) a significant gain in IQ dependent on the SES of the adoptive families (mean = 7.7 and mean = 19.5 IQ points in low and high SES, respectively), (ii) IQs after adoption are significantly correlated with IQs before adoption, and (iii) during adolescence, verbal IQs are significantly lower than performance IQs.

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