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Geographical Aspects of the Emergence of Infectious Diseases

Peter Haggett
Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography
Vol. 76, No. 2, The Changing Geography of Disease Distributions (1994), pp. 91-104
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography
DOI: 10.2307/490592
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/490592
Page Count: 14
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Geographical Aspects of the Emergence of Infectious Diseases
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Abstract

The historical geography of infectious diseases of humans shows a constantly changing pattern. In the late 20th century that pattern is being affected by strong population growth in the host population, by worldwide environmental changes associated with that growth, and by increased spatial mobility for both the disease-causing microorganisms and for the human host. The paper identifies some of the geographical factors that have shaped disease emergence in the past and those that appear to be playing a part today.

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