Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Reproductive Strategy of the Freshwater Pearl Mussel Margaritifera margaritifera

G. Bauer
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 56, No. 2 (Jun., 1987), pp. 691-704
DOI: 10.2307/5077
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/5077
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reproductive Strategy of the Freshwater Pearl Mussel Margaritifera margaritifera
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) The reproductive strategy of the freshwater pearl mussel (Margaritifera margaritifera L.) is marked by two components yielding a high fertility maintained under varying densities. (2) The first component is a combination of a `high life expectancy during the reproductive period', a `high fertility which is independent of age' and an `absence of a postreproductive period' resulting in a single female producing c. 200 X 106 glochidia during its reproductive life span of up to 75 years. (3) The second component reflects the selective values of different modes of reproduction at varying population densities. At high densities most animals are dioecious. At low densities females become hermaphrodites and self-fertilization dominates. But also under these conditions the males probably compensate for some of the deleterious effect of inbreeding. (4) This strategy offers three advantages: (i) due to the extended reproductive period populations are less vulnerable to fluctuations in reproductive success; (ii) the reproductive costs are evenly dispersed over the reproductive period; (iii) even sparse (founder) populations can persist for a long time and are able to reproduce successfully.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
691
    691
  • Thumbnail: Page 
692
    692
  • Thumbnail: Page 
693
    693
  • Thumbnail: Page 
694
    694
  • Thumbnail: Page 
695
    695
  • Thumbnail: Page 
696
    696
  • Thumbnail: Page 
697
    697
  • Thumbnail: Page 
698
    698
  • Thumbnail: Page 
699
    699
  • Thumbnail: Page 
700
    700
  • Thumbnail: Page 
701
    701
  • Thumbnail: Page 
702
    702
  • Thumbnail: Page 
703
    703
  • Thumbnail: Page 
704
    704