Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Amiloride Causes Changes in the Mechanical Properties of Hair Cell Bundles in the Fish Lateral Line Similar to Those Induced by Dihydrostreptomycin

J. Esther C. Wiersinga-Post and Sietse M. van Netten
Proceedings: Biological Sciences
Vol. 265, No. 1396 (Apr. 7, 1998), pp. 615-623
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/50960
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Amiloride Causes Changes in the Mechanical Properties of Hair Cell Bundles in the Fish Lateral Line Similar to Those Induced by Dihydrostreptomycin
Preview not available

Abstract

Amiloride is a known blocker of the mechano-electrical transduction current in sensory hair cells. Measurements of cupular motion in the lateral line organ of fish now show that amiloride concurrently changes the micromechanical properties of the hair cell bundles. The effects of amiloride on the mechanics and receptor potentials of the hair cells resemble those previously observed for the aminoglycoside drug dihydrostreptomycin (DHSM) and are similarly antagonized by Ca2+. We hypothesize that amiloride and DHSM act on hair cells in two correlated ways, which manifest themselves in both the electrical and mechanical properties of the transduction process. One action is the reduction of the transduction current with a concurrent increase in hair bundle stiffness. The other action is a shift of the hair cell's operating point on a current-displacement curve, with a concomitant shift along the associated hair bundle stiffness-displacement curve. The latter action has the opposite effect to that of the first and thus may lead, at relatively low blocker concentrations, to both an increase of transduction current and a decrease in hair bundle stiffness.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
615
    615
  • Thumbnail: Page 
616
    616
  • Thumbnail: Page 
617
    617
  • Thumbnail: Page 
618
    618
  • Thumbnail: Page 
619
    619
  • Thumbnail: Page 
620
    620
  • Thumbnail: Page 
621
    621
  • Thumbnail: Page 
622
    622
  • Thumbnail: Page 
623
    623