Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Seasonal Food Shortage, Weight Loss, and the Timing of Births in Saddle-Back Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis)

Anne W. Goldizen, J. Terborgh, F. Cornejo, D. T. Porras and R. Evans
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 57, No. 3 (Oct., 1988), pp. 893-901
DOI: 10.2307/5099
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/5099
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Seasonal Food Shortage, Weight Loss, and the Timing of Births in Saddle-Back Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis)
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Annual birth peaks in the breeding of several primate species are thought to correlate with seasonal changes in food availability, yet no study published to date has both correlated birth seasonality with food availability, and shown that the physical conditions of individuals decline during annual periods of food scarcity. (2) We document the following observations in a population of saddle-back tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis Spix; Callitrichidae) at the Cocha Cashu Biological Station in Peru's Manu National Park. (3) The availability of both fruits and insects was substantially lower during the annual 4-month dry season (May-September) than at other times of the year. (4) Individual tamarins lost an average of 5% of their weight over this period. (5) Three-quarters of twenty-two S. fuscicollis births at this site occurred between November and February, and none occurred between mid-March and mid-August. (6) We suggest that tamarin births at Cocha Cashu are timed such that lactation and weaning occur when food is abundant, because during the period of low food availability, there would be insufficient food to meet the demands of lactation and to serve as easily obtainable weaning foods. In this sort of seasonal environment, tamarins appear to be constrained, by the seasonality of their food supply, from breeding as frequently as they do in captivity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
893
    893
  • Thumbnail: Page 
894
    894
  • Thumbnail: Page 
895
    895
  • Thumbnail: Page 
896
    896
  • Thumbnail: Page 
897
    897
  • Thumbnail: Page 
898
    898
  • Thumbnail: Page 
899
    899
  • Thumbnail: Page 
900
    900
  • Thumbnail: Page 
901
    901