Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Brood Size Manipulations in the Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus): Effects on Offspring and Parent Survival

C. Dijkstra, A. Bult, S. Bijlsma, S. Daan, T. Meijer and M. Zijlstra
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 59, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 269-285
DOI: 10.2307/5172
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/5172
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Brood Size Manipulations in the Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus): Effects on Offspring and Parent Survival
Preview not available

Abstract

(1) Brood reductions and enlargements were carried out in kestrel nests to evaluate the consequences of raising different numbers of nestlings for both the offspring and the parents. (2) Brood enlargements caused increased daily hunting activity of the parents, reduced growth rate of the nestlings, increased nestling mortality and enhanced weight loss in the female parent. Brood reductions caused an increased food intake by the nestlings, in spite of (non-significantly) reduced parental hunting activity. Local survival of the parents was negatively correlated with the experimental change in brood size. (3) A review of the literature on brood enlargements is presented, showing that parents were able to raise more young till fledging than their natural broods in twenty-nine out of forty altricial bird species investigated. Negative effects of brood enlargements on parental survival or future reproduction were established in eight out of twelve species investigated. (4) The results are consistent with the theory that parental work for the offspring entails an inherent reduction in future reproductive output and that natural broods, by being smaller than the maximum number of nestlings that can be raised, maximize the total reproductive output.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274
  • Thumbnail: Page 
275
    275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
276
    276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
277
    277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
278
    278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
279
    279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
280
    280
  • Thumbnail: Page 
281
    281
  • Thumbnail: Page 
282
    282
  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
284
    284
  • Thumbnail: Page 
285
    285