Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Influence of River Flow Rate on the Breeding Behaviour of Calopteryx Damselflies

David Wingfield Gibbons and Deborah Pain
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 61, No. 2 (Jun., 1992), pp. 283-289
DOI: 10.2307/5321
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/5321
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Influence of River Flow Rate on the Breeding Behaviour of Calopteryx Damselflies
Preview not available

Abstract

1. Territorial, courtship and oviposition behaviour of Calopteryx splendens xanthostoma (Charpentier) and C. haemorrhoidalis (Vander Linden) were studied in two freshwater streams in southern France. 2. Females of both species preferred to oviposit in aquatic vegetation found in fast-flowing water. This was not due to preference for a particular species of vegetation; most ovipositions by C. s. xanthostoma occurred in a single species, and female C. haemorrhoidalis ceased ovipositing in an area of fast water after the flow was experimentally slowed. 3. Males of both species defended areas of oviposition vegetation as territories. Territorial disputes were common in fast-flowing parts of the streams while slow-flowing areas were often underfended. Male C. haemorrhoidalis deserted previously defended areas after an experimental decrease in flow rate. 4. The mating success of male C. s. xanthostoma increased with the rate of flow of water through their territory, but only up to a rate of 0.15 m s-1. Above this, males spent so much time in territorial defence that they probably missed mating opportunities. 5. Males of both species sometimes courted females by falling onto the water surface and floating with the current. Males that performed this display had a higher mating success than those that did not. We suggest this display has evolved to indicate territory quality to females.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
283
    283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
284
    284
  • Thumbnail: Page 
285
    285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
286
    286
  • Thumbnail: Page 
287
    287
  • Thumbnail: Page 
288
    288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289