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William Hauser's Hesperian Harp and Olive Leaf: Shape-Note Tunebooks as Emblems of Change and Progress

Daniel W. Patterson
The Journal of American Folklore
Vol. 101, No. 399 (Jan. - Mar., 1988), pp. 23-36
DOI: 10.2307/540247
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/540247
Page Count: 14
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William Hauser's Hesperian Harp and Olive Leaf: Shape-Note Tunebooks as Emblems of Change and Progress
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Abstract

Students of the shape-note tradition see the 19th-century songbooks as repositories of archaic tunes and their compilers as conservative folk musicians who pressed musical notation into the service of traditional song. But the family history, career, tunebooks, and other writings of William Hauser present a different picture: of aspiration to move from Moravianism and the German ethnic community into Methodism and the Southern mainstream, from yeoman farmer to slaveholder, from rural to urban professional sphere, from secessionist to American, and from traditional to popular and classical music.

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