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The Yellowman Tapes, 1966-1997

Barre Toelken
The Journal of American Folklore
Vol. 111, No. 442 (Autumn, 1998), pp. 381-391
DOI: 10.2307/541046
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/541046
Page Count: 11
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The Yellowman Tapes, 1966-1997
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Abstract

This article considers the final disposal of field-recorded tapes that are believed by the informant's family to embody certain dangers to researchers, to the natural world, and to themselves. Motives for keeping or destroying the tapes are discussed in the light of modern concerns such as the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, Navajo worldview, scholarly interests, fieldwork ethics, and personal responsibilities of the fieldworker. I espouse the view that folklorists stand to learn more and do better work when scholarly decisions are guided by the culture we study, even when taking this course causes disruption in our academic assumptions.

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