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The Ice Core Record: Past Archive of the Climate and Signpost to the Future [and Discussion]

Claude Lorius, Jean Jouzel, Dominique Raynaud, G. Weller, I. N. McCave and C. Moore
Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences
Vol. 338, No. 1285, Antarctica and Environmental Change (Nov. 30, 1992), pp. 227-234
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/55716
Page Count: 8
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The Ice Core Record: Past Archive of the Climate and Signpost to the Future [and Discussion]
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Abstract

Ice cores from Antarctica provide multi proxy records of climate and environmental parameters. They have recorded glacial-interglacial temperature changes with cold stages associated with lower snow accumulation and high concentration of aerosols from marine and continental sources. The 160 000-year-long Vostok isotope temperature record exhibits signatures of the insolation orbital forcing as well as a close association between climate and greenhouse gas concentrations. These gases are likely to have played an important role in amplifying the amplitude of past global temperature changes. Data from the ice show evidence of anthropogenic impact on atmospheric greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) over the past 200 years. They suggest a climate sensitivity to greenhouse forcing which is consistent with General Circulation Models simulations for a future doubled atmospheric CO2. Further ice coring in Antarctica should help to improve our understanding of the climate system.

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