Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

An Experimental Study of Migration in the Glanville Fritillary Butterfly Melitaea cinxia

Mikko Kuussaari, Marko Nieminen and Ilkka Hanski
Journal of Animal Ecology
Vol. 65, No. 6 (Nov., 1996), pp. 791-801
DOI: 10.2307/5677
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/5677
Page Count: 11
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($18.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Experimental Study of Migration in the Glanville Fritillary Butterfly Melitaea cinxia
Preview not available

Abstract

1. We studied factors affecting emigration and immigration behaviour in the butterfly Melitaea cinxia by releasing 882 newly emerged marked butterflies into 16 habitat patches in a network of 64 empty patches on an isolated island (area 1.6km2). 2. Of the 363 butterflies that were recaptured at least once, 40% were recorded in a new patch during their lifetime. Females emigrated earlier and moved further away than males. One-third of males appeared to remain permanently in, whereas females gradually drifted away from, the release patch. 3. High density of butterflies, great abundance of flowers, and large patch area decreased emigration, whereas open landscape around the patch increased emigration. Females that emigrated were on average larger than females that stayed in the patch of release. 4. In total, 152 immigrants were recorded in 32 patches. Numbers of immigrants increased with patch area and abundance of flowering plants. 5. Results on emigration suggest that conserving an isolated butterfly population is more successful in an area with physical barriers to migration than in an open landscape. The possible tendency of butterflies to leave a patch with low density should be taken into consideration in introductions of butterflies to empty habitat patches. 6. Results on immigration indicate the significance of nectar sources and patch size in successful colonization of empty habitat patches.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793
  • Thumbnail: Page 
794
    794
  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800
  • Thumbnail: Page 
801
    801
Part of Sustainability