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A Reinterpretation of Male Dominance in the Chicano Family

Alfredo Mirandé
The Family Coordinator
Vol. 28, No. 4, Men's Roles in the Family (Oct., 1979), pp. 473-479
DOI: 10.2307/583507
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/583507
Page Count: 7
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A Reinterpretation of Male Dominance in the Chicano Family
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Abstract

Male dominance in the Chicano family is re-examined and a new conceptualization of the male role is suggested. The traditional view of the Chicano family as patriarchal and authoritarian is erroneous and based on unsupported myths and stereotypes held by both social scientists and the public at large. A review of recent research studies suggests that the dominant pattern of decision-making and action-taking in the Chicano family is not male-dominated and authoritarian but egalitarian. Husband and wife share not only in decision making but in the performance of household tasks and child care; sharp sex role segregation appears to be the exception rather than the rule among Chicano couples.

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