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Imagined Interactions and the Family

Paul C. Rosenblatt and Cynthia Meyer
Family Relations
Vol. 35, No. 2 (Apr., 1986), pp. 319-324
DOI: 10.2307/583641
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/583641
Page Count: 6
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Imagined Interactions and the Family
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Abstract

Imagined interaction is a relatively neglected but seemingly important aspect of close relationships. In the present theoretical analysis, the forms and functions of imagined interaction are discussed. Imagined interaction aids in the clarification of thinking, in dealing with unfinished and emergent relationship business, in preparing for a possibly difficult interaction, and in dealing with opposing aspects of self. A therapist needs to be aware of such interactions and to know how to understand and use such interactions, including imagined interactions with the therapist.

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