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Unemployment and Family Stress: A Reassessment

L. Eugene Thomas, Esther Mccabe and Jane E. Berry
Family Relations
Vol. 29, No. 4, Family Stress, Copying and Adaptation (Oct., 1980), pp. 517-524
DOI: 10.2307/584467
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584467
Page Count: 8
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Unemployment and Family Stress: A Reassessment
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Abstract

Past research, particularly that dating from the Depression of the 1930s, suggests that unemployment tends to precipitate crises for many families. Two small-scale studies are reported in which it was found that unemployed managers and professionals did not report strain on family relationships. A review of other studies conducted in the present decade indicate that for a majority of families, including white- and blue-collar workers, crisis does not accompany husbands' unemployment. Three causes for the apparent changes the impact of unemployment has upon families are discussed: improved financial support for the unemployed; erosion of the psychological importance of work; and changing sex roles.

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