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Residential Differences in the Composition of the Helping Networks of Impaired Elders

Raymond T. Coward, Stephen J. Cutler and Russell A. Mullens
Family Relations
Vol. 39, No. 1 (Jan., 1990), pp. 44-50
DOI: 10.2307/584947
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/584947
Page Count: 7
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Residential Differences in the Composition of the Helping Networks of Impaired Elders
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Abstract

Using data from the 1984 Supplement on Aging to the National Health Interview Survey, this study examines residential differences in the helping network composition of impaired elders (N = 3,761). Zero-order comparisons provide no evidence of a significant association between residence and network composition. However, significant differences in sources of assistance are observed as level of impairment increases. Moreover, severely impaired elders residing in nonmetropolitan communities are less apt than their metropolitan counterparts to be receiving aid from a formal provider and are significantly more likely to be receiving assistance from informal helpers exclusively.

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